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The Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Saint-Laurent – Mount Royal supports the project of a shopping mall at the intersection of Highways 15 and 40

Saint-Laurent, Quebec. February 10th, 2015

The Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Saint-Laurent-Mount Royal has expressed its support to the Mayor of Town of Mount Royal, Philippe Roy, who supports the project of a mixed developmentto be built by Immobilier Carbonleo Real Estate Inc. at the intersection of Highways 15 and 40.

The revitalization efforts of the industrial area of Town of Mount Royal, which began nearly 10 years ago, has yielded impressive resultsIn 2004, with a vacancy rate of nearly 25% in its industrial zone, the city began a revitalization strategy focused on the decor sector under the brand Quartier Design Royalmount.  Today, more than eighty companies, stores, distributors, artisans etc. in the decor business are at the heart of an active economic zone  of over 400 companies and counts among its corporate citizens several corporate offices, as well as leaders in Quebec’s retail trade.  Carbonleo’s announcement  will complete this offer with a mixed development of offices, shops, movie theaters and hotels, as well as a conference and convention center. This investment will strengthen the regional supply and will welcome a new generation of stores and other businesses wishing to enjoy an environment for renewal.

The President of the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Saint-Laurent–Mount Royal, Mr. William Habib, is convinced of the benefits of such a project on the economy of the territory. “This project will certainly lead positive effects on trade and the economy, not only for the Town of Mount Royal and Saint-Laurent, but also for the City of Montreal at large.  In addition, the project of the extension of Cavendish Boulevard should reassure the most skeptical regarding the traffic problems”. Like Mayor Philippe Roy, Habib believes that this initiative will help revitalize an aging industrial area of TMR.

About the CCSLMR

Created in 1981, the mission of the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Saint-Laurent  – Mount Royal (CCSLMR) has been to bring together and inform, as well as to defend, the interests of its members. The Chamber is the platform of choice for business people to meet, as well as a recognized spokesperson in the area of economic development.

 

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For additional information, please communicate with:

Safia Djerroud

Communication Manager

514.333.5222 ext. 226 safiad@ccsl-mr.com

 

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Canada’s international trade: the November 2015 statistics

Canadian exports increased 0.4% in November while imports were down 0.7%, reducing Canada’s international trade deficit from $2.5 billion in October to $2 billion in November.

Total exports rose to $43.3 billion, led by motor vehicles and parts (+5.9%), metal ores and non-metallic minerals (+20.4%) and forestry products and building and packaging materials (+5.5%). These gains were partially offset by lower exports of energy products (-6.6%) and consumer goods (-4.5%).Total imports declined to $45.2 billion, the main declines being in electronic and electrical equipment (-2.9%), energy products (-6.4%) and consumer goods (-1%). These were moderated by a 2.5% increase in industrial machinery and equipment.

Geographically, exports to the United States rose 1.3% and imports declined 0.1%, increasing Canada’s trade surplus with the U.S. from $1.7 billion to $2.1 billion. As exports to other countries declined 2.2% while imports decreased 2.1%, Canada’s trade deficit with countries other than the U.S. went from $4.2 billion to $4.1 billion.

South of the border, U.S. November exports reached $182.2 billion, about 1% below October and imports $224.6 billion or 1.5% below October, lowering the U.S. international trade deficit from $44.6 billion to $42.4 billion. U.S. exports of industrial supplies and materials and consumer goods decreased the most, while capital and consumer goods led the decrease in imports.

 

Christian Sivière, Import Export Logistics Solutions, Montréal

Christian.siviere@videotron.ca

All Rights Reserved January 2016

 

Canada’s international trade, the May 2015 statistics

 

Canada’s exports declined 0.6% in May while imports were up 0.2%, bringing our trade deficit  withthe world from $3 billion in April to $3.3 billion in May.

Exports declined to $42 billion, the fifth consecutive monthly decrease, with declines in metal and non-metallic mineral products (-5.8%) and metal ores and non-metallic minerals (-9.2%) partly offset by gains in aircraft and other transportation equipment (+10.3%) as well as motor vehicles and parts (+2.7%). Imports edged up to $45.3 billion, as 7 of 11 sections increased, with consumer goods up 2.3%, metal and non-metallic mineral products up 5%, while imports of aircraft and other transportation equipment declined 12.4% and industrial machinery and equipment were down 5%.

Specifically concerning the all important energy sector, our exports of energy products increased 1.3%, with exports of refined petroleum energy products rising 7.4% but exports of crude oil and crude bitumen falling 1.1%. Imports of energy products meanwhile were up 2.9%, led by crude oil and crude bitumen.

As to the breakdown by region, exports to the United States declined only 0.3% but exports to other countries fell 1.6%, the United Kingdom and China decreasing the most. Imports from the United States increased 0.5% while imports from elsewhere were down 0.2%, led by Japan and Italy, while imports from the United Kingdom and Norway were up. As a result, Canada’s trade surplus with the United States narrowed from $2.3 billion to $2.1 billion while our trade deficit with other countries widened from $5.3 billion to $5.5 billion.

South of the border meantime, the U.S. international trade deficit in goods and services increased from $40.7 billion in April to $41.9 billion in May, as exports decreased 0.8% while imports remained stable. Capital goods led the decrease in U.S. exports, particularly civilian aircrafts and industrial machines. The U.S. deficit with China and Mexico went up but their deficit with the European Union was down.

 

Canada’s international merchandise trade, January 2015 statistics

Canada’s exports declined 2.8% in January while imports were unchanged from December so our trade deficit therefore widened from $1.2 billion to $2.5 billion, the largest since the record $2.9 billion deficit of July 2012.

Exports declined to $42.6 billion, as four of eleven sections decreased, with energy products, mainly crude oil and crude bitumen, being the main contributor to the decline (-23%). Exports of metal and non-metallic mineral products were down 8.6%, unwrought precious metals and alloys down by 13.5% and unwrought aluminum products down by 20.4%, while exports of motor vehicles and parts were up 3.1%.

January imports were virtually unchanged at $45.1 billion, with advances in five sections offset by declines in the other sections. Imports of electronic and electrical equipment rose 9.3%, while  industrial machinery, equipment and parts increased 8.2%. Imports of energy products, on the other hand, fell 19.2%.

Exports to the United States declined 3.1% to $31.8 billion while exports to other countries were down 1.9%. The decrease was spread across most principal trading partners, led by lower exports to the Netherlands and Italy, while exports to the United Kingdom went up. Imports from the United States were down 0.1% but imports from other countries were up 0.2% with increases from China partially offset by decreases from the United Kingdom and Saudi Arabia. Our trade surplus with the United States narrowed from $2.2 billion to $1.2 billion, the lowest since 1992 while our deficit with other countries went from $3.4 billion  to $3.7 billion.

South of the border, figures released by the U.S. Census bureau showed that the U.S. goods and services deficit was $41.8 billionin January, down 9% from December. January exports amounted to $189.4 billion, down 3% from December while January imports came to $231.2 billion, down 4% from December.The U.S. recorded surpluses with South and Central America but ran deficits with China, the European Union, Japan, Mexico, South Korea, India and Canada.

 

Christian Sivière        Import Export Logistics Solutions TM, Montréal       

514 652 2557christian.siviere@videotron.ca      All Rights Reserved  March 2015          Solimpex®

Sources: Statistics Canada, U.S. Census Bureau

 

Canada’s international merchandise trade, October 2014 statistics

Canada’s merchandise imports were up 0.5% to $44.8 billion in October, while exports increased by a mere 0.1% to $44.9 billion, bringing our trade surplus with the world from $307 million in September to $99 million in October.

The increase in imports was led by consumer goods (+3.%)  and aircraft and other transportation  equipment and parts (+12.4%), while imports of energy products were down (-10.1%). The marginal increase in exports came from industrial machinery, equipment and parts (+8%),    while exports of farm, fishing and intermediate food products declined (-8.6%).

Geographically, our imports from the United States rose 1% to $30.3 billion, while our imports from countries other than the United States declined 0.5% to $14.5 billion, the main contributors being Germany (-11.5%) and the United Kingdom (-11.2%) while imports from China increased (+3.5%).  Exports to the United States were up 0.7% to $33.9 billion, while exports to countries other than the United States declined 1.8% to $11.1 billion. Exports to Hong Kong fell by half and exports to Germany fell substantially (-29.9%) but exports to the United Kingdom were up (+10.2%). As a result, Canada’s trade surplus with the United States narrowed from $3.6 billion to $3.5 billion, while our trade deficit with other countries widened from $3.3 billion to $3.4 billion.

South of the border meanwhile, the U.S. goods and services deficit reached $43.4 billion in October, down from $43.6 billion in September, with exports at $197.5 billion and imports at $241 billion. Capital goods, civilian aircraft andgenerators, transformers and accessories contributed the most to the increase in exports of goods while automotive vehicles and parts, trucks and buses lead the increase in imports. The U.S. recorded surpluses in its trade with South and Central America  and with the United Kingdom, but had deficits with China, the European Union (mainly Germany, Italy and France), Japan, Mexico, Canada, South Korea, India and Saudi Arabia.

 

Christian Sivière, Import Export Logistics Solutions, Montréal    

Tel : 514 652 2557  Christian.siviere@videotron.ca                                All Rights Reserved December 2014

Sources : Statistics Canada, U.S. Census Bureau

 

Canada’s international merchandise trade, September 2014 statistics

Canada’s merchandise imports declined 1.5% in September while exports rose 1.1%, bringing our trade balance with the world from a deficit of $463 million in August to a surplus of $710 million in September. Imports declined to $44.1 billion, the main contributors to this decline being energy products (-19.4%), metal and non-metallic mineral products (-12%) and consumer goods (-3%), while imports of industrial machinery, equipment and parts (+5.3%), electronic and electrical equipment and parts

(+5.1%) and motor vehicles and parts (+7%) were up. Exports rose to $44.8 billion, with increases in 8 of 11 sections, led by motor vehicles and parts (+6.4%), consumer goods (+6.6%) and metal and non-metallic mineral products (+6.2%), while exports of farm, fishing and intermediate food products (-10.5%) as well as aircraft and other transportation equipment and parts (-20.9%) were down.

Geographically, imports from the United States were up 0.7% to $29.7 billion, led by motor vehicles and parts while exports increased 0.8% to $33.7 billion, leaving Canada’s trade surplus with the United States virtually unchanged at $3.9 billion. Imports from countries other than the United States, on the other hand, fell 5.8% to $14.3 billion, due to lower imports from the trading area “all other countries” (-12.6%). Exports to countries other than the U.S. were up 2.1% to $11.1 billion, led by the European Union (+6.8%). Canada’s deficit with these countries therefore narrowed from $4.3 billion to $3.2 billion.

South of the border meantime, statistics published by the Department of Commerce revealed that

U.S. exports totalled $195.6 billion in September, while U.S. imports reached $238.6 billion, resulting in a goods and services deficit of $43 billion, up from $40 billion in August. U.S. September exports were $3 billion lower than August exports, while September imports were $0.1 billion more than in August. The decrease in exports of goods reflected reductions in industrial supplies and materials, capital goods, consumer goods and automotive vehicles and engines while increases occurred in foods, feeds and beverages. The decrease in imports reflected decreases in industrial supplies and materials, capital goods and automotive vehicles whereas imports of consumer goods and foods, feeds and beverages were up.

 

Christian Sivière, Import Export Logistics Solutions, Montréal                                                                                                        

Tel : 514 652 2557   Christian.siviere@videotron.ca    All Rights Reserved November 2014

Sources: Statistics Canada, U.S. Census Bureau

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